Style

When I look back on my wedding day, I remember feeling like I wished I could just slow everything down and just bask in the moment with my best friend. So much of the wedding day is lived in these fleeting moments, and with that in mind I always commit to make the time I spend taking portraits with the newlyweds easygoing, fun and natural. I believe it’s the only reasonable way to be—after all, no one can be expected to know all the poses right away, especially on such an emotional high! I work with my couples during the engagement session to build confidence and craft poses that reflect the couple and their personalities, so that on the wedding day I can use portrait time to highlight a one-of-a-kind love story. The more I know about my couples, the more spectacular and special their images become.

I think smiles are best paired with light-drenched images and soft but vivid color palettes. To that end, I’ve always been drawn to the timeless depth and character of film photography. While some may consider film obsolete or irrelevant considering the technological advances in digital photography, I still feel the traditional methods of film photography most truly and beautifully express color and light. The best way I’ve heard it described is that digital captures how a moment looked, whereas film captures how a moment felt. Though I’ve fallen in love with film, I still believe that digital photography provides some advantages in certain situations on the wedding day. As such, I employ a hybrid approach of using both digital and film photography throughout the day—all in service of best telling the story unfolding in front of me. 

 
Amanda-Brian-Bride-Groom-72.jpg